Emotional History Reflection

Producing an emotional history story was found to be more difficult than thought. The story presented is about the excitement and initial fears associated with having a baby. I thought this to be a strong emotional history story as my Grandma told her element of surprise when finding out she was pregnant with triplets six weeks before she was meant to be giving birth. The major emotions of Grandma demonstrated surprise yet also fear for her babies’ health. Grandma seemed appropriate for this emotional history task as her voice is tonality diverse, this making her an engaging and vibrant story teller. Although I have heard this story many times before, it remains a quirky and exiting every time I ask about it and so I thought it would perfect for this task.

From a journalistic point of view, I believe that this story can be made to matter as it provides a sense of humour to a natural process of life that can be quite daunting for women. Although having triplets is a rarity, I believe that the fears associated with having a baby are extremely relatable along with the resulting feeling of relief after giving birth. The laughter and joy that is expressed within the story opens listeners to reminisce on moments in life when they have felt similar.

The use of ambient sound was incorporated to assist listeners to relate or understand the joyous surprise of having a baby. The ambient sound itself was of a two week old baby making noises before starting to cry. Content from a lecture week in week four, Alan Halls claim that “No sound is innocent” (Hall 2010, p.98 in McHugh 2016) resonates here as crying baby in the circumstance of this piece symbolises joy to new birth where it can also alternatively be spun to a negative situation.

The mood of my audio story was overall intended to bring joy, which was attempted though the use of music. When in lecture five it was claimed: “It’s about using the phrasing inherent in the music to get the maximum impact from your story.” (McHugh, 2016), I felt urged to incorporate instrumental within my audio story to capture the most joyful moments. Music was also used to give the the listener context of the time this event happened. The song ‘All You Need is Love’ by The Beatles was released in 1967, the same year that my Grandma fell pregnant and gave birth to the triplets. Instead of having an original version of the song, I recorded an instrumental acoustic cover to pair with the interview so that words in the song were not clashing. The song still remaining recognizable, which places the story in context and can be associated with happy and joyful emotions.

Producer of radio program Echoes, Jeff Towne, is correct in claiming “poor audio quality can distract from strong content” as unfortunately, when recording my interview, I made the naive mistake of using my mobile phone to record sound which made the quality of this interview insufficient. Due to the poor quality, I needed to perform the interview again and sadly, the information and emotion I obtained in the second interview was not as gripping as the previous. This fault in practice not only limited my time in the process of gathering and producing my task, but it also affected the execution of the story itself. Editing the second interview became more difficult as the interviewee often briefly referred to things she had discussed in the previous interview where her original emotion had been expressed. I found that I had to ask more questions to retrieve answers that I got in the first interview and even then, the energy of the story was not as high.

Overall, the presented story seems like less of an emotional journey for the interviewee and in places, seems over edited. Yet working with what I had, I tried my best to encapsulate and provide an auditory visual that resonates happiness and joy to listeners.

Audio Log

TIME

CONTENT – summary

EVALUATION

0.02

When I first fell pregnant I was thinking I was having a little girl because I felt so different, I felt pushing on each side of my stomach..

Setting up for oddity in story

0.20

He said “no I think you should have an xray because I cant get any heart beat”

* quoting doctor, fear for babies health

0.25

When I had the xrays I went back to his surgery…he ran out and grabbed the xray…he told me to sit down first…

*** good suspense

0.37

he put one finger up, two… three! he put three fingers up.. *giggles* and he was that excited

*** very clear excitement and surprise in tone

0.47

Reg came home in his ute and asked me how’d I go..“oh I’m having triplets”…”WHAT” *giggles* “what are we gunna do?!”

** slight babble- humorous. Strong emotion of fear from husband.

0.59

I thought “ohh, how could I have triplets, I’ll wait till I them first”….“not gunna buy three of everything and something might happen, you know”

*** humorous thought. Although precautionary and fearful

1.09

I had quite an audience.. there was the matron nurses, several doctors that was there… except Reg… He was sick…

* slow to get to point

1.27

When it finished..I laid there and closed my eyes… I didn’s answer him because I was saying a little prayer

** slight suspense- if mother and babies are okay

1.41

He said “Look at them…They’re little beauties!…Look at this one!”… and the other two… sound asleep.

** Revealing with excitement

1.52

And when I realised they were all healthy babies, I said thank God for that

***emotional relief – no longer fearing babies health

 

Audio Link

5491009

 

References

Hall, A (2010). “Cigarettes and Dance Steps” in Reality Radio: Telling True Stories in Sound, ed. J. Biewen and A. Dilworth, Chapel Hill, UNC Press.

McHugh, S (2016). Lecture, Week 4, “Using actuality in audio production”, 15 August 2016. McHugh, S (2016). Lecture, Week 5, “Music and Mixing Audio Stories”, 22 August 2016.

Towne, J. (2015). Podcasting Basics, Part 1: Voice Recording Gear – Transom. [online] Transom. Available at: http://transom.org/2015/podcasting-basics-part-1-voice-recording-gear/ [Accessed 28 Aug. 2016].

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